ScienceDaily: Top Technology News


Machine learning technique reconstructs images passing through a multimode fiber

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 02:51 PM PDT

Through innovative use of a neural network that mimics image processing by the human brain, a research team reports accurate reconstruction of images transmitted over optical fibers for distances of up to a kilometer.


Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don’t?

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 02:51 PM PDT

Researchers have developed a new computational approach to identify the genes that may be important to help microbes live successfully in the human gut.


For UW physicists, the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride is full of surprises

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 02:50 PM PDT

Researchers report that the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride can undergo ‘ferroelectric switching.’ Materials with ferroelectric properties can have applications in memory storage, capacitors, RFID card technologies and even medical sensors — and tungsten ditelluride is the first exfoliated 2-D material known to undergo ferroelectric switching.


How to protect yeast from damage in biofuel production

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 02:50 PM PDT

Some chemicals used to speed up the breakdown of plants for production of biofuels like ethanol are poison to the yeasts that turn the plant sugars into fuel. Researchers have identified two changes to a single gene that can make the yeast tolerate the pretreatment chemicals.


A video game can change the brain, may improve empathy in middle schoolers

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 02:50 PM PDT

A fantastical scenario involving a space-exploring robot crashing on a distant planet is the premise of a video game developed for middle schoolers by researchers to study whether video games can boost kids’ empathy, and to understand how learning such skills can change neural connections in the brain.




Pairs of small colliding galaxies may seed future stars

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 11:45 AM PDT

In a new study, astronomers show how gas expelled in the merger of two small galaxies can linger across vast distances for billions of years, where it may eventually feed gas to more massive galaxies to make new stars.


Ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 11:45 AM PDT

An unusual kind of star-planet hybrid atmosphere is emerging from studies of ultrahot planets orbiting close to other stars.


Scientists solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 11:11 AM PDT

A new discovery explains what happens during the phase transition in Dirac materials, paving the way for engineering advanced electronics that perform significantly faster.


New study views cancer treatment as a game to find strategies that improve patient outcomes

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 09:56 AM PDT

Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article. The study challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are typically administered continuously at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) until the tumor progresses.


Viewing cancer treatment as a game to find strategies that improve patient outcomes

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:25 AM PDT

Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article. The study challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are typically administered continuously at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) until the tumor progresses.


Spinning heat shield for future spacecraft

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:25 AM PDT

A newly developed prototype flexible heat shield for spacecraft could reduce the cost of space travel and even aid future space missions to Mars.




How ions gather water molecules around them

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:25 AM PDT

Charged particles in aqueous solutions are always surrounded by a shell of water molecules. However, much is still unknown about the nature of this so-called hydration shell. Using terahertz spectroscopy, chemists have gained new insights into how an ion affects the water molecules in its environment.


Scientists design material that can store energy like an eagle’s grip

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:24 AM PDT

What do a flea and an eagle have in common? They can store energy in their feet without having to continuously contract their muscles to then jump high or hold on to prey. Now scientists have created materials that can store energy this way, be squeezed repeatedly without damage, and even change shape if necessary.


Mini antimatter accelerator could rival the likes of the Large Hadron Collider

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:24 AM PDT

Researchers have found a way to accelerate antimatter in a thousand-times smaller space than current accelerators, boosting the science of exotic particles.


Quantum chains in graphene nanoribbons

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:24 AM PDT

Researchers have achieved a breakthrough that could in future be used for precise nanotransistors or — in the distant future — possibly even quantum computers, as the


Popular encryption software: Researchers help close security hole

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:24 AM PDT

Cybersecurity researchers have helped close a security vulnerability that could have allowed hackers to steal encryption keys from a popular security package by briefly listening in on unintended ‘side channel’ signals from smartphones.


Supercomputer simulations show new target in HIV-1 replication

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 08:24 AM PDT

A new study has found naturally-occurring compound inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) promotes both assembly and maturation of HIV-1. NSF-XSEDE allocations on the Stampede2 supercomputing system at the Texas Advanced Computing Center and on Anton2 at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center simulated atomistic interactions of IP6 molecule with HIV structural proteins. The research opens door for development of new treatments of HIV-1 virus.




Crowdsourcing algorithms to predict epileptic seizures

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 06:35 AM PDT

A study reveals clinically relevant epileptic seizure prediction is possible in a wider range of patients than previously thought, thanks to the crowdsourcing of more than 10,000 algorithms worldwide.


New 3D-printed device could help treat spinal cord injuries

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 06:34 AM PDT

Engineers and medical researchers have teamed up to create a groundbreaking 3D-printed device that could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some function.


Satellite measurements of the Earth’s magnetosphere promise better space weather forecasts

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 06:34 AM PDT

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University equipped the Arase satellite with sensors to study the convoluted interactions between high-energy particles in the inner magnetosphere and the Earth’s electric and magnetic field. They have collected their first set of data from the satellite and from ground-based sensors, which they will soon analyze. Their approach promises to provide better predictions of harmful bursts of high-energy particles from the magnetosphere.


Hybrid catalyst with high enantiomer selectivity

Posted: 09 Aug 2018 06:34 AM PDT

Researchers have developed a technology to create a hybrid catalyst from simple-structured, commercially available rhodium and organic catalysts, which reduces chemical waste and produces molecules with high selectivity of an enantiomer, a pair of molecular structures that are non-superimposable mirror images of each other. This technology is expected to assist in rapid and low-cost drug synthesis.


Laser ranging can ‘see’ 3D objects melting in fires

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 12:33 PM PDT

Researchers have used a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system to image three-dimensional (3D) objects melting in flames. The method could offer a precise, safe and compact way to measure structures as they collapse in fires.


Scientists squeeze nanocrystals in a liquid droplet into a solid-like state and back again

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 12:33 PM PDT

A team led by scientists found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid, and then to reverse the process.




Designer polymers on demand

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:43 AM PDT

When jewelers create a necklace, they control the order and number of each bead or jewel they use to form a desired pattern. It’s been challenging for scientists to do the same thing when designing polymers — until now. Researchers report a new method using light and chemical reactions to control how subunits come together to form polymers with precise properties.


Proof-of-concept technique makes nanoparticles attractive for new medications

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:43 AM PDT

Researchers have developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral medications.


Blocking sunlight to cool Earth won’t reduce crop damage from global warming

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:43 AM PDT

Proposals to inject sulfate aerosols into the upper atmosphere to block and scatter sunlight and reduce global temperatures could, some say, also increase crop yields because of reduced heat stress on plants. A new study shows that other effects counterbalance the positive effects of reduced heat stress. Specifically, blocking sunlight reduces photosynthesis, which offsets any improvement from slightly cooler temperatures. The team based their analysis on the effects from two previous volcanic eruptions.


Tying down electrons with nanoribbons

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:42 AM PDT

Nanoribbons are promising topological materials displaying novel electronic properties. Chemists and physicists have found a way to join two different types of nanoribbon to create a topological insulator that confines single electrons to the junction between them. Alternating nanoribbon types create a chain of interacting electrons that act as metals, insulators or interacting spins — qubits for a quantum computer — depending on separation. This opens the door to designer materials with unique quantum properties.


Fat-blocking effect of nanofibers discovered

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:42 AM PDT

Tiny balls of nano-sized cellulose fibers added to food reduced fat absorption by up to half in laboratory and animal experiments, scientists report.


Balloon-borne telescope looks for cosmic gamma rays

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:42 AM PDT

Cosmic gamma rays can provide us with important insights into the high-energy phenomena in our universe. The GRAINE (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) collaboration aims to high resolution record high-energy cosmic gamma rays using a balloon-borne nuclear emulsion telescope. In April 2018 the team successfully




Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:42 AM PDT

Modification of defective nanoporous materials has unique effects on their properties.


Scientists create biodegradable, paper-based biobatteries

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:41 AM PDT

The batteries of the future may be made out of paper. Researchers have created a biodegradable, paper-based battery that is more efficient than previously possible.


Expedition probes ocean’s smallest organisms for climate answers

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 10:41 AM PDT

In August a team of scientists is sailing 200 miles to the northeastern Pacific Ocean with advanced robotics and other instruments on a month-long quest to investigate plankton and their impact on the carbon cycle.


Holding law enforcement accountable for electronic surveillance

Posted: 08 Aug 2018 04:54 AM PDT

A new cryptographic system is aimed at improving government accountability for surveillance while still maintaining enough confidentiality for police to do their jobs. AUDIT involves a public ledger in which officials share information about data requests through so-called ‘cryptographic commitments.’ If the courts decide to release the data they requested, the public can be assured that the correct documents were released in full; if they decide not to, then that refusal itself is made known.

ScienceDaily: Top Technology News 10. August 2018https://i1.wp.com/diewebservisten.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/siencedaily-klein.jpg?fit=1024%2C521https://i1.wp.com/diewebservisten.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/siencedaily-klein.jpg?resize=150%2C150MichaelNewsTechnologycancer,find,game,improve,may,new,outcomes,patient,strategies,treatmentScienceDaily: Top Technology News Machine learning technique reconstructs images passing through a multimode fiber Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don't? For UW physicists, the 2-D form of tungsten ditelluride is full of surprises How to protect yeast from damage in biofuel production A video...The world own the knowledge